Fear and Loathing in the Court: Justice Thomas’s Audience of One in McKee v. Cosby

By: Zachary Tooman Lamenting Richard Nixon’s nomination of William Rehnquist for Associate Justice in December 1971, Dr. Hunter Thompson labeled Rehnquist a “vengeful geek” who would, along with fellow nominee Lewis Powell, “reduce the U.S. Supreme Court to the level of a piss-poor bowling team in Memphis,” and create a “disastrous, nazi-bent shift of the … Continue reading Fear and Loathing in the Court: Justice Thomas’s Audience of One in McKee v. Cosby

Professional Speech & Conduct: Do the Courts Know the Difference?

By: Prakash Kadiri Is giving nutritional advice protected by the First Amendment? Absolutely. Now, what if you’re not licensed by the state but compensated for that advice—is your speech still protected by the First Amendment? A Florida District Court recently said no. In deciding cases like this, courts try to distinguish whether the licensing laws— … Continue reading Professional Speech & Conduct: Do the Courts Know the Difference?

Social Security ‘Big Brother’ for the Disabled

By: Elliotte Kiel Applicant Surveillance to Prevent Fraud In March 2019, the Social Security Administration (SSA) announced it is looking into social media surveillance of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) applicants. The agency justified this as part of their “responsibility to detect and prevent fraud.” SSDI pays monthly benefits to people who cannot regularly work … Continue reading Social Security ‘Big Brother’ for the Disabled

Categorizing Clery Crimes: The Grey Between Crime and Bias

By: Lindsay Byers October is a busy month for institutions that are subject to the Clery Act, as they begin releasing their safety reports. While many institutions, like UNC Chapel Hill, might be focused on the shocking uptick of reported sexual assaults on campus, Syracuse University is facing an additional issue. Syracuse students have voiced … Continue reading Categorizing Clery Crimes: The Grey Between Crime and Bias