Religious Gatherings in the Time of Coronavirus

By: Claire Lieberman Introduction States enacted various guidelines in March and April to promote social distancing in an effort to combat the spread of COVID-19. By the end of April, 35 states had either completely prohibited religious gatherings or limited them to some extent. In contrast, 15 states exempted religious gatherings from stay-at-home directives, describing … Continue reading Religious Gatherings in the Time of Coronavirus

Freedom of Speech: Off the Street, and Onto Your Screen

By: Rolf Lundberg, Staff Writer A. The Alternative Channel Through the First Amendment, Americans are arguably afforded greater protection of their speech than in any other western democracy. However, those protections are not boundless. Under certain circumstances the government is compelled to, and may, prohibit free speech in some public forums. In order for such … Continue reading Freedom of Speech: Off the Street, and Onto Your Screen

A Possible End to Political Party Judicial Requirements

By: Caroline Christman Freedom of Association First Amendment theories suggest that political party affiliation should not be a deciding factor when considering judicial hopefuls. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects free speech, also implies the freedom of association to every U.S. citizen. A bedrock principle for the protection of free speech by … Continue reading A Possible End to Political Party Judicial Requirements

“Play[ing] In the Joints” of the First Amendment: Application of Montana Constitution’s “No Aid” Provision Violates Free Exercise Clause

By: Kristopher L. Caudle* The First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides two fundamental guarantees for all citizens: The government shall not establish an official religion; and the government shall not infringe upon a citizen’s right to freely exercise their chosen religion. However, the Supreme Court continues to recognize areas where there is ample … Continue reading “Play[ing] In the Joints” of the First Amendment: Application of Montana Constitution’s “No Aid” Provision Violates Free Exercise Clause

Privacy in Public Universities: DTH Media v. Folt, Public Records, and FERPA

By: Morgan McNeil The University of North Carolina has been no stranger to the spotlight recently. Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, UNC alum, gained notoriety when she publicly accused then-Supreme Court candidate Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault. And amidst the Silent Sam scandal, the Daily Tar Heel Media Group, the parent company of The Daily Tar Heel, … Continue reading Privacy in Public Universities: DTH Media v. Folt, Public Records, and FERPA

NEWSFLASH! 3/9-4/6

As social distancing mandates remain in effect across the country due to the COVID-19 outbreak, large gatherings are largely prohibited. And while many trial courts have continued cases, appellate courts continue to issue decisions. Accordingly, some First Amendment issues remain in the news. Here are a couple of recent headlines: Despite restrictions in every state, … Continue reading NEWSFLASH! 3/9-4/6

NEWSFLASH! 2/24-3/9

Happy Monday! Although FALR staffers are enjoying a week of Spring Break, First Amendment doesn't stop! Here are some recent headlines: The Oklahoma House of Representatives has passed a bill that prohibits the state from contracting with any companies that boycott Israel.  The law states that the Oklahoma “shall not enter into a contract with … Continue reading NEWSFLASH! 2/24-3/9

The Right to (Begin to) Right a Wrong

By: Mannirmal Jawa Across the Southern United States, Confederate monuments stand on government property as active souvenirs of the Jim Crow era. Local governments that try to remove the statues sometimes run into hurdles. For example, sometimes members of the public protest the removal; the infamous Unite the Right rally that turned deadly in Charlottesville … Continue reading The Right to (Begin to) Right a Wrong